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Stripper Music Monday: Lords of Acid

Played in strip clubs more than AC/DC, Kid Rock, and Prince combined, the songs of Lords of Acid are a peeler staple. I’m not a particular fan, but a new Lords of Acid record is definitely stripper news.

That being said, I have very little desire to search out any of the tracks here, so. Maybe I’ll hear it later? In the meantime, I’m in Austin for the South by Southwest interactive, film and music conferences, and will certainly update if I discover any amazing new music for work. I look forward to seeing current work faves Das Racist, Ellie Goulding,  Liturgy (kidding! I wish) and others.

The Week in Links: March 11

On Charlie Sheen’s partners: “A woman’s active embrace of the fame monster or participation in the sex industry, we seem to say, means that she compromises her right not to be assaulted, let alone humiliated, insulted or degraded.”

Ottawa’s government lawyers will argue that prostitutes choose a risky life and therefore don’t deserve state protection. But tell us how you really feel, assholes.

There’s a new book on the British man who murdered three prostitutes.

Kansas looks poised to ban lapdancing while Oregon keeps working to pass anti-strip club bills.

A St. Louis high school teacher has been fired because of her past in porn and in England, a nurse was fired for her former work as an escort (which is legal) after prostituting while on sick leave.

NYC’s Naked Cowboy tried to sue a (now former) stripper.

The Taxman and the Domina

It’s tax season! That makes me think of a story I found out about a few weeks ago involving a Domina and a silly man with a government job.

A tax collector from Secaucus, NJ named Alan Bartolozzi wired (maybe more than) $780,000 in taxpayer money to a Domina with addresses in 5 states. He wired money internationally too, but there isn’t any info out there on where… I imagine somewhere sunny. She featured the guy on her website, but it’s down. I am assuming he’s dressed up in sissy clothes or bent over with objects inside him based on my own experience with government workers, but I could be wrong.

An Interview With A Charming Young Man From Denver

I met the fella from Denver at the Desiree Alliance Conference while sitting by the pool. I was reading a comic I’d gotten from someone and he wanted to know what it was about. Instead of talking to him about it like any other person, I just held it out and showed it to him because I am painfully awkward. I’m working on it. Thankfully I got another chance to talk to him when we were sitting by the pool a few days later and I told him I was going to take him upstairs and marry him in the hotel chapel. Also, this conference was in Vegas.

He’s a good guy, but most importantly he’s one of the few male sex workers I know so I figured he’d be a good interview. I was right.

Stripper Music Monday: The Glitch Mob

After platform heels and baby wipes, the most essential item in my work bag is my iPod. You just can’t depend on strip club DJs to have what you want to hear. Some of them are voracious consumers and producers of music with a catholic knowledge, and some of them don’t know “Bad Romance” from “Bad Reputation.” Right now I work with more of the latter than the former, so I always bring my own music.

It’s like a fun game to find new tracks, and while I’m not a very solid hit predictor (why is everyone dancing to the Black Eyed Peas when that awesome Big Boi record came out last year?), some clubs have reputations as just that—little focus groups of dancers and customers. In December, All Things Considered ran a short segment on the Atlanta practice of using strip clubs as a testing ground for tracks. Billboard found the subject worthy of a cover story back in 2006, and anecdotally, I can remember hearing musicians in Memphis and Detroit talking about this practice in the late 90s. It makes a lot of sense for the strip club to be a track’s first stop because it’s a place where you can directly observe the crowd, the ladies, and the sound on club speakers.